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Example Essay Speech About School Bully

While many parents assume that bullying is a problem confined to middle school or high school, it can begin as early a kindergarten and become firmly seeded in a school culture by the second or third grade.

If you are a parent faced with bullying, you need to take a firm stance so that the behavior is stopped before it becomes a de facto part of a child's school life.

Defining Bullying

The definition is simple: bullying is any aggressive behavior designed to intimidate or torment.

It can be physical, such as pushing or hitting, or verbal, such as name-calling or spreading gossip. In younger children, bullying can also include exclusion, either by urging others to ostracize an individual or by forming cliques to which others are conspicuously excluded.

While cyberbullying may be less prevalent in younger school children, the same behaviors that govern online bullying are played out in real life.

The statistics are dismaying. According to research published in the journal BMC Public Health, as many as 13 percent of children in kindergarten and elementary school are victims of bullying, while 11 percent admit to being a bully. An additional four percent can be described as victim-bullies, a great many of whom will become bullies in later life as a misguided form of self-protection.

Why Kids Bully

The kids most commonly targeted by bullies are those with a disability, who are obese, or are less adept at schoolwork or making friends.

In order to establish social dominance, a bully will often need little more than an unusual name to target a child for abuse, often under the guise of teasing. Other children, meanwhile, will take part, either because they are eager for social acceptance or fearful of ostracization themselves.

In the end, children will attack the same things that many adults do, namely behaviors, beliefs, or characteristics which stand out and challenge a social order to which person believes he or she is a part.

Fear of the unusual can sometimes lead children to exhibit aggressive behaviors to hide insecurities that they themselves do not understand. Such behaviors may be reinforced by parents who exhibit the same biases or use aggression as a means of dealing with conflict.

What Parents Can Do

Rather than dismissing schoolyard bullying as "a phase" that children will eventually outgrow, parents have the unique opportunity to alter these behaviors by helping young children overcome the very fears, anxieties, and insecurity that place them at risk.

There are six things you can do to help:

  • Stay connected with your child. The more you know about your child's classmates and school life, the more likely you will be to spot any changes the child's demeanor or interactions. This includes both the child being bullied and the child who is bullying. Make a point of discussing the events of the day every day, and pay attention to not only what the child says but what he or she may be avoiding in conversation.
  • Look for the warning signs. If a child is a victim of bullying, the first warning sign will usually a change in behavior. This may include withdrawing, exhibiting sudden aggression or anger, misbehaving, or being reluctant to go the school. If your child is a bully, the clues may be harder to pick up, but it is not uncommon to hear the bully make disparaging and boastful remarks about others, often without realizing how unkind the behavior is.​
  • Explain what bullying is. Young children understand that hitting or pushing another child is wrong. Even teasing is something they instinctively know is hurtful. But kids can be both sophisticated and unsophisticated in their approach to these behaviors. On the one hand, they can dismiss teasing as "just kidding around" and, on the other, fail to comprehend how other hurtful behaviors like exclusion can be. Help your child understand bullying in all its forms, both direct and subtle.
  • Teach a child empathy. Young children have the unique talent of making connections. Unlike adults, who are able to navigate conflict and justify ill behaviors, kids who are five, six, or seven see action and consequence in a more straightforward way. If your child is a bully, ask how he or she would feel if the shoe were on the other foot. If your child is being bullied, help them understand why some kids misbehave can effectively "take them off the hook" and confirm that they are neither strange nor blameworthy.
  • Tell a child what to do if he or she witnesses bullying. Children will often not want to get involved if someone else is being bullied out of fear of reprisal. Teach them how not acting is essentially the same as approving of the behavior. A child should understand that reporting a bully is not "tattling" but merely a way to stop others from getting hurt. Let your child know that he or she should report any such behavior to you or a teacher so that an adult can intervene.
  • Lead by example. Many parents do not take bullying seriously enough and will dismiss some behaviors as being "not as bad" as others. Do not allow yourself to be swayed by these arguments. If such behaviors are ignored, young children will believe that they have been given tacit permission to bully. Even things like exclusion can be acted upon by teachers by breaking up groups, pairing kids who don't interact with school projects and regularly changing classroom seating.

As a parent, do not accept that nothing can be done. The greatest opportunity for change is not in high school when social dynamics are set; it's in kindergarten and elementary school when behaviors and personalities are still evolving.

If school officials fail to act, voice your concerns to the parent-teacher association or file a formal complaint with the local school board. Include a detailed outline of the bullying events and any other information that may support your claims. In the end, how you act can determine whether a child is allowed to suffer in silence.

Source:

Jansen, P.; Verlinden, M.; Dommisse van-Berkel, A. et al. "Prevalence of bullying and victimization among children in early elementary school: Do family and school neighborhood socioeconomic status matter?"BMC Public School. 2012; 12:494. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-494.

Bullying is a major problem in many schools across the world. The media has reported many cases where students injure or even kill other students due to the bullying acts. Not only that, but some victims of bullying have committed to suicide. Bullying is never acceptable. For that reason, all stakeholders in the education sector must work together to find ways of dealing with the problem in an effort to guarantee the safety of all students. One way of helping students to become aware of the issue is to educate students about why bullying is to be discouraged and what to do if someone tries to bully them. One strategy in helping students to understand the issue is to have them write a persuasive essay on why bullying is wrong. Writing a good persuasive essay involves several guidelines.

Guidelines for Writing a Good Persuasive Essay on Bullying:

  • First, plan out the main points to be discussed in each body paragraph. Ideas should be well-organized and easily followed by the reader. Language must be clear and precise. Word choice can also have some emotional impact while at the same time completely appropriate for school use. Details to support main ideas may include facts, statistics, examples, and anecdotes.
  • Secondly, the essay should stimulate the students’ desire to end bullying or to intercede on the behalf of someone being bullied, such as a classmate in a school setting. The writer might share an experience with bullying or something heard in the news. The writer could also discuss common types of bullying to help the reader understand what constitutes bullying. The idea is to help the reader develop empathy and understanding for those who have been bullied or tend to be victimized by others.
  • The tone of the persuasive essay is also important. The writer wants to come across as understanding the issue and caring about the victims and potential victims of bullying, especially in school and among student social circles. The tone also needs to be persuasive in nature. It helps to give the reader a reason for caring. Has the reader ever been bullied? Did he participate in bullying, and if so, why? How can preventing or stopping others from being bullied help the reader? How would he feel if his brother or sister or friend was bullied?
  • Finally, the essay should include suggestions on how to recognize incidents or potential incidents of bullying and what to do to stop it. In addition, it could provide some resources for those who are or have been bullied as well as for those who tend to bully others. Resources might include teachers, parents, and organizations. The idea is to prevent or stop bullying.

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