• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Statistics Research Paper Ideas For 8th

Research Projects in Statistics

Joseph Kincaid, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City


Project Ideas


Project Examples

Project Ideas


Here are some generic project ideas that you can use to jump start the students brainstorming process. In each case, several factors are given that might affect the dependent variable. Students could use one or more of the factors depending on the type of statistical analysis you want them to do.
  • How does gas mileage depend on the [blank] of the vehicle? [Blank] could be make, model, year, number of people in the car, etc.
  • How does the gender distribution of grocery store customers depend on [blank]? Here, [blank] could be the day of the week, the time of day, the location of the store, etc.
  • Does the weight of an M&M candy depend on its color? Note: I would not use type of candy (i.e., plain, peanut, etc) as an explanatory variable here because the results are too obvious. If the students are ambitious, they could research whether the variability of an M&M candy depends on its type.
  • Is the distribution of [quality] in [snacks] the same for various types of [snacks]? The [quality] could be colors for M&Ms, animal shapes for animal crackers, etc.
  • Is there a relationship between [physical measurement] and [sports performance] . The [physical measurement] could be hand span, length of inseam, length of foot, etc. The [sports performance] could be free throw percentage, time for 50m sprint, etc.
  • Which candy bar brand has the highest percentage of [ingredient]? The [ingredient] could be peanuts, chocolate, etc. This type of question presents challenges for the measuring process, but the subjects, i.e. the candy bars, would be readily available and nearly homogeneous reducing the need for extensive randomization.
  • Does [measurement] depend on the area of town? The [measurement] could be the average street width, the distance between fire hydrants, the width of the yard between the curb and the sidewalk, etc.
  • Which [food or drug] would dissolve quicker in the human body? This type of project has an interesting twist in that the environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, acidity) within the human body would need to be simulated by the students.
  • Which brand of sidewalk chalk would last the longest?
  • Which of two brands of chicken noodle soup contains the most chicken?
  • What is the average age at death for [people] buried in [place] during [time]. The [place] could be a particular cemetery or a particular town. The [time] could be a span of years or no restriction at all. The [people] could be children, adults, males, females, military personnel, etc. Using children or adults will naturally require a definition. Identifying males or females in a cemetery might be difficult due to missing first names or ambiguous first names.




Do you need to design an experiment for a psychology assignment? Chances are you can come up with plenty of interesting ideas on your own, but sometimes it can be helpful to explore some other ideas for inspiration.

Many experimental methods courses require students to design and sometimes perform their own psychology experiments. Finding a good experiment idea can be critical to your success, but it can be a difficult task.

If you need to design an experiment for a psychology assignment, there are plenty of great places to look for inspiration. The key is to start your search early, so that you have plenty of time to do background research as well as to design and perform your experiment.

Try One of These Psychology Experiment Ideas

Most of these can be performed easily at home or at school. Always remember to discuss your idea with your instructor before beginning your experiment, particularly if your research involves human participants. You may need to get approval from your teacher or from an institutional review board before you begin.

Finding the right psychology experiment idea can be a challenge, but as you can see there are a lot of great ways to come up with inspiration. Once you have an idea in mind, the next step is to learn more about how to conduct a psychology experiment.

Some psychology experiment ideas you might want to try:

  • Do colors really impact moods? Conduct an investigation to see if the color blue makes people feel calm, or if the color red leaves them feeling agitated.
  • Can color cause physiological reactions? Perform an experiment to determine whether certain colors cause a participant's blood pressure to rise or fall.
  • Can certain colors improve learning? Could the color of paper used in a test or assignment have an impact on academic performance? You may have heard teachers or students claim that printing text on green paper helps students read better, or that yellow paper helps students perform better on math exams. Design an experiment to see whether using a specific color of paper helps improve students' scores on math exams.
  • Can different types of music lead to different physiological responses? Measure the heart rates of participants in response to various types of music to see if there is a difference.
  • Does eating breakfast really help students do better in school? According to some, eating breakfast can have a beneficial influence on school performance. One study found that children who ate a healthy breakfast learned better and had more energy than students who did not eat breakfast. Compare test scores of students who ate breakfast to those who did not.
  • Do people who use the social media site Facebook exhibit signs of addiction?
  • Do action films cause people to eat more popcorn and candy during a movie?
  • How much information can people store in short-term memory? One classic experiment suggests that people can store between five to nine items, but rehearsal strategies such as chunking can significantly increase memorization and recall. A simple word memorization experiment is an excellent and fairly easy psychology science fair idea.
  • Do people rate individuals with perfectly symmetrical faces as more beautiful than those with asymmetrical faces?
  • What is the Stroop Effect? The Stroop Effect is a phenomenon in which it is easier to say the color of a word if it matches the semantic meaning of the word. For example, if someone asked you to say the color of the word "Black" that was also printed in black ink, it would be easier to say the correct color than if it were printed in green ink. This fun experiment will be sure to impress.
  • Can smelling one thing while tasting another impact a person's ability to detect what the food really is?
  • Are people really able to "feel like someone is watching" them?
  • How likely are people to conform to the opinions of a group? This conformity experiment investigates the impact of group pressure on individual behavior.
  • Do creative people see optical illusions differently than more analytical people?
  • Does gender influence short-term memory? In this interesting experiment, you can focus on a variety of research questions such as whether boys or girls are better at remembering specific types of information.
  • How likely are people to conform in groups? Imagine that you're in a math class and the instructor asks a basic math question. What is 8 x 4? The teacher begins asking individual students in the room for the answer. You are surprised when the first student answers 27. Then the next student answers 27. And the next! When the teacher finally comes to you, do you trust your own math skills and say 32? Or do you go along with what the rest of the group seems to believe is the correct answer? Try this experiment to see what percentage of people are likely to conform.
  • Could a person's taste in music offer hints about their personality? Previous research has suggested that people who prefer certain styles of music tend to exhibit similar personality traits.

Explore Your Interests to Find Good Experiment Ideas

Think about the things that interest you. During your time in psychology classes, you have probably spent a little time wondering about the answers to various questions.

Are there any topics in particular that grab your interest? Pick two or three major areas within psychology that interest you the most, and then make a list of questions that you have about the topic. Any of these questions could potentially serve as an experiment idea.

Find Psychology Experiment Ideas in Textbooks

Another great source of experiment ideas is your own psychology textbooks. Choose specific chapters or sections that you find particularly interesting, like a chapter on social psychology or a section on child development.

Browse through some of the experiments discussed in your book and then think of how you might devise an experiment related to some of the questions asked in your textbook. The reference section at the back of your textbook can also serve as a great source for additional reference material.

Discuss Experiment Ideas With Other Students in Class

Brainstorm with classmates to gather outside ideas. Get together with a group of students in order to come up with a list of interesting ideas, subjects or questions. Use the information you gathered during your brainstorming session to serve as a basis for your experiment topic. This is also a great way to get feedback on some of your own ideas and to determine if they are worth exploring in greater depth.

Check Out Some Classic Psychology Experiments

Looking at a few classic psychology experiments can be an excellent way to trigger some of your own unique ideas. You might try conducting your own version of a famous experiment or even updating a classic experiment to assess a slightly different question.

In many cases, you might not be able to exactly replicate an experiment, but you can use some of the well-known studies as a basis for inspiration.

Review the Literature on a Particular Topic

If you have a general idea about what topic you'd like to do an experiment on, then you might want to spend a little time doing a brief literature review before you start designing your experiment.

Visit your university library and find some of the best books and articles that cover your particular topic. What research has already been done in this area? Are there any major questions that still need to be answered? By tackling this step early, writing the introduction to your lab report or research paper will be much easier later on.

Talk to Your Instructor

If all else fails, consider discussing your concerns with your instructor. Ask for pointers about what might make a good experiment topic for your specific assignment and request some assistance in coming up with a good idea. While it may seem intimidating to ask for help, your instructor should be more than happy to assist and may be able to provide helpful pointers and insights that you might not gather otherwise.

A Word From Verywell

If you need to design or conduct a psychology experiment, there are plenty of great ideas out there for you to explore. Consider one of the ideas offered on this list, or explore some of your own questions about the human mind and behavior. Always be sure to observe any guidelines provided by your instructor and always obtain the appropriate permission before conducting any research with human or animal subjects.

Sources:

Britt, MA. Psych Experiments. Avon, MA: 2017.

Martin, DW. Doing Psychology Experiments. Belmont,CA: Thompson Wadworth; 2008.

One thought on “Statistics Research Paper Ideas For 8th

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *